INNOVATION EDUCATION SUPPORT

The Total Hip Replacement

Canine THR is a surgical procedure in which the arthritic hip joint is replaced with a new prosthetic ball (femoral head) and socket (acetabulum). THR can be performed on dogs ranging from five through 170 pounds, and also on cats.
It is the only treatment that fully restores life-long mobility and prevents recurrence of hip dysplasia; the leading cause of hind-leg lameness in dogs.

HIP REPLACEMENT SOLUTIONS FOR EVEN THE LARGEST OR SMALLEST BREEDS

BIOMEDTRIX TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENTS COMPLETED WORLDWIDE SINCE 1990

OF ALL PATIENTS TO RECEIVE A BIOMEDTRIX THR RECOVER FULL MOBILITY

HIP DYSPLASIA

Commonly presented with larger breed dogs, hip dysplasia is an abnormal development and growth of the hip joint. Both hips are usually affected but symptoms may be more severe on one side. Hip dysplasia is manifested by varying degrees of laxity (looseness) of the hip joint with instability and malformation of the joint components. Arthritis is the long-term consequence of hip joint laxity.

SYMPTOMS of hip dysplasia may be subtle. They can include the presence of lameness in one or both hind legs and the reluctance to climb stairs or jump. Dogs that are affected often become less active and less playful. They may be reluctant to go on walks and their gait may be a “bunny hop” at certain speeds.

Recipients of BioMedtrix Total Hip Replacement should be able to use the new hip for the rest of their lives. Patients are expected to recover full mobility, and suffer no lameness or muscle atrophy, overcompensation, or limitations of any kind.

SURGICAL OVERVIEW

During surgery, the arthritic femoral head is removed, the arthritic acetabulum is prepared, and the acetabular component (socket) is implanted.
Next, the femur is prepared, and the femoral component (stem) is implanted. The femoral head (ball) is placed on the femoral stem, and the new joint is articulated by placing the femoral head (ball) within the acetabulum (socket).
The Total Hip Replacement requires special training to be performed reliably. Certification Workshops are held regularly to provide surgeons with the resources to ensure full recovery.
Originally adapted from the analogous procedure in human orthopedics, this procedure has been developed over 45 years, and continually benefits from the expertise and support of pioneers in the veterinary industry.

RECOVERY

Most veterinarians keep dogs for one to three days following surgery.

Dogs often begin using their operated limb on the day of surgery.

Activity should be supervised and limited to leash walks for approximately six weeks after surgery.

The average length of a THR surgical procedure is approximately 75 minutes.

OVER 1,000 IMPLANT COMBINATIONS

BioMedtrix proudly introduced the CFX® (Cemented Fixation) Total Hip System in 1990, and the BFX® (Biologic Fixation) system in 2003. Since then, over 54,000 procedures have been performed.
Available in a broad range of sizes, the implants in each system are interchangeable, allowing for hybrid fixation, and are prepared to a common surgical preparation with a common set of instruments, providing greater versatility in the clinical options for total hip replacement.

Hybrid fixation is achieved when one component is cemented and the other is press-fit. The common femoral head is compatible with both the cemented and cementless acetabular cup and femoral stem implants.

Both applications use the same primary surgical steps, providing the option to press-fit or cement into the same acetabular or femoral preparation. The decision to use cemented or cementless (biologic fixation) implants is preferably made prior to surgery and varies with surgeon experience, preference and the morphology of the patient’s bone.

FEMORAL STEM TECHNOLOGIES

BioMedtrix continues to pioneer cementless, press-fit technologies for the Canine THR with solutions utilizing both bone in-growth and geometric stabilization methods.
The CFX® Micro & Nano Hip System has been developed to provide Total Hip Replacement (THR) as the primary recommendation for very small dog breeds and cats.
As a viable option over femoral head ostectomy (FHO), a THR provides wider range of motion, improved function and pain-free joints. It is estimated over 1,000 cases have been performed on dogs and cats from 4 pounds to 20 pounds since 2005.

The Micro & Nano implant system consists of acetabular cups, femoral heads, and both modular and monoblock femoral stems. All modular components are interchangeable.

Modular stems affix with the femoral head and acetabular cup implants in the same fashion as Standard and Large Breed systems.

The decision to make a one-piece stem and head (monoblock) was driven by the size of the head and the need to maintain adequate range of motion.

  • micr-nan-instrument-set

WORKSHOPS

BioMedtrix conducts product workshops throughout the United States and Europe. Each workshop details the application and surgical technique for a specific product such as the Universal Hip (BFX® and CFX® systems), Micro & Nano Hip, Canine Total Knee, TATE Elbow®, or I-Loc® Nail. Workshops consist of classroom instruction supported by lab experience, offering participants the opportunity to use the surgical instrumentation in order to familiarize themselves with the procedure.

Frequently Asked Questions

Canine THR is a surgical procedure in which the arthritic hip joint surfaces are replaced with a new prosthetic ball and socket. The prosthesis is designed to fit precisely and mimics the anatomy of the original joint. The arthritic joint is pain free after total hip replacement.

BioMedtrix proudly introduced the CFX® (Cement Fixation) Total Hip System in 1990, and the BFX® (Biologic Fixation) system in 2003. Since then, over 54,000 procedures have been performed. The implants in each system are interchangeable and are prepared to a common surgical preparation with a common set of instruments, providing greater versatility in the clinical options for total hip replacement.

Hip dysplasia is an abnormal development and growth of the hip joint. Both hips are usually affected but symptoms may be more severe on one side. Hip dysplasia is manifested by varying degrees of laxity (looseness) of the hip joint with instability and malformation of the joint components. Arthritis is the long-term consequence of hip joint laxity.
The signs of hip dysplasia may be subtle. They can include the presence of lameness in one or both hind legs and the reluctance to climb stairs or jump. Dogs that are affected often become less active and less playful. They may be reluctant to go on walks and their gait may be a “bunny hop” at certain speeds.
The first THR in a dog was performed in 1957. Since their introduction in 1990, over 54,000 procedures have been performed using BioMedtrix implants. THR can be performed on dogs ranging from five through 170 pounds, and also on cats.
The success rate is very high. More than 95% of the patients who receive a THR should be able to use the new hip for the rest of their lives.
Most veterinarians keep dogs for one to three days following surgery. In some rare instances, high-risk patients may be hospitalized for longer periods to provide additional assistance or to protect the stability of the new prosthetic joint.
Dogs often begin using their operated limb on the day of surgery. Most dogs use their operated leg quite well within a couple of weeks but activity should be supervised and limited to leash walks for approximately six weeks after surgery.
A THR involves removing both the arthritic ball (femoral head) and socket (acetabulum) and replacing them with an artificial ball and socket joint.

The surgical procedure is precisely planned using several radiographic (X-ray) views and specialized templates that match the available implant sizes.

The average length of a THR surgical procedure is approximately 75 minutes.

During surgery, the arthritic femoral head is removed, the arthritic acetabulum is prepared, and the acetabular component (socket) is implanted. Next, the femur is prepared, and the femoral component (stem) is implanted. The femoral head (ball) is placed on the femoral stem, and the new joint is articulated by placing the femoral head (ball) within the acetabulum (socket).

Both applications use the same primary surgical steps, providing the option to press-fit or cement into the same acetabular or femoral preparation. With a common head, implants are interchangeable between the two systems, allowing for hybrid fixation. Cement one component and press-fit the other. Both BFX and CFX implants are available in a broad range of sizes. This combination of interchangeability and multiple implant sizes provides clinical options for the surgeon to resolve hip reconstruction problems in a wide range of dog sizes and breeds.
One set of instruments provides a common accurate preparation for either cementing CFX components or press-fitting BFX components.